TV - Movies
The Untold Truth
Of The Umbrella
Academy's
Robert Sheehan
By ANGELA CAMPBELL and BRIAN BOONE
Irish actor Robert Sheehan is no stranger to American audiences, having brought to life numerous beloved characters in TV and movie projects, including Klaus Hargreeves in Netflix's "The Umbrella Academy." His oeuvre includes such works as “Misfits,” “Love/Hate,” “Mortal Engines” and “The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones.”
As Klaus on "The Umbrella Academy," Sheehan has become one of the series' most popular stars, largely due to his honest portrayal of a bisexual character. However, he himself identifies as straight and doesn’t think sexuality should be the defining trait of any character.
One of Sheehan’s projects is a podcast titled "The Earth Locker," which he co-hosts with his "The Umbrella Academy" co-star Tom Hopper and health enthusiast Byron Knight. The trio speaks with experts in all fields about nutrition, meditation, and the environment to "make us all better humans for this planet."
While many people felt isolated during the COVID-19 lockdown, Sheehan admitted he loved the experience. He enjoyed going for strolls, meditating, growing plants, and writing, which he started doing as a hobby while living in West Hollywood, California in 2015.
While 45 million households reportedly watched the first season of "The Umbrella Academy," Sheehan knows at least two people who didn't: his parents. However, he says they really liked his role on the Irish TV series “Love/Hate” because it was something they could relate to the most.
As a staunch environmentalist, Sheehan has committed himself to a "zero-waste" lifestyle, aiming to generate as little trash as possible. This includes buying package-free food in bulk at specialty grocery stores, where he must bring all his own containers. Although it was hard work at first, he has become used to it and finds that it forces him to eat nutritiously.
In 2021, Sheehan published his first book, “Disappearing Act: A Host of Other Characters in 16 Short Stories.” Most of the stories are essentially monologues, told in the first person from the perspective of characters that the author attempted to embody — befitting his history as an actor.