TV - Movies
The Ending Of
Jerry And Marge
Go Large
Explained
By JOE CAPRARO
"Jerry and Marge Go Large" feels like a heist movie without the crime but the two protagonists face plenty of conflicts. Act II introduces villains Tyler and Eric, a couple of arrogant Harvard students who also find the loophole and start a betting group of their own.
Eric And Tyler
Uly Schlesinger’s Tyler is the stereotypical slimy bad guy, and Bryan Cranston’s Jerry is a pragmatic character who backs off after Tyler threatens him. However, after getting inspiration from Marge’s enthusiasm the feel-good story arc starts kicking into gear.
Conflict
Jerry takes the high road at every turn, while Tyler is completely detestable. The Selbees’ selflessness is a large part of what makes the film so endearing. It's also both jarring and welcome when so much of what we see, fiction or nonfiction, is full of bad people doing bad things.
High Road vs. Low Road
A Rainn Wilson voiceover closes the film, announcing that the couple used most of their winnings to offer business loans to townsfolk — most of whom were also able to pay for their children or grandchildren's college educations. “Be kind and generous" is just one of many lessons in the movie.
Kind and Generous
Jerry's honesty and community-centered mindset bring little conflict to the film, but his peaceful kindness throughout is refreshing in an era of anti-heroes and heroes that become villains. Marge also offers a lesson in bravery, creative thinking, and the belief in her and Jerry’s love.
Simple and Sincere
On one level, "Jerry and Marge Go Large" may be a game of tic-tac-toe in a world of 12-level chess, but at the same time, the film's simplicity hides a road map to peace of mind that has lately become harder and harder to achieve. It’s an adventure in kindness and it clearly points us towards it.
Message Is Clear