TV - Movies
Quiz: The
Weirdest Movie
Monsters In
Horror Film
History
By PAUL GAITA
Plenty of movie monsters are memorable for actually being scary, but then there are the ones that are memorable for all the wrong reasons. Maybe the filmmakers had a low budget and had to get creative, or maybe the director just had a weird vision, but these horror movie monsters were more laughable than scary. Select your answers and see how you stack up against other players!
“Sting of Death” banks on the notion that we might find a huge man o' war scary, and that we'd consider a half-man, half-man o' war positively terrifying. Director William Grefe offers up an actor covered in goop and sporting what appears to be a large Mylar balloon with slimy streamers over his head, which provokes more concern for his safety than abject fear.
“Death Bed: The Bed That Eats” does indeed detail a berth with an appetite for those unlucky to catch a few winks on it, but it also has a complicated supernatural element. A demon accidentally kills a human woman while attempting to consummate his affection for her, and his tears of blood bring the bed to life, albeit with the need to devour anyone unlucky enough to use it.
Marketed as a no-calorie dessert, the yogurt-like Stuff develops a diehard following among consumers, who discover far too late that the treat is actually a living organism that takes over their brains and bodies before exuding itself, soft serve-style, from all available orifices. As with Larry Cohen's other films, “The Stuff” works as both skewed satire and gonzo genre film.
Technically, “Blood Freak” is about Herschell, a biker who is fed experimental drugs at a turkey farm and ends up with a giant immobile turkey head and a thirst for blood. Only the power of prayer, courtesy of a comely hitchhiker, saves him from both the hell of addiction and the Thanksgiving Day dinner table.
The 1985 microchiller “Attack of the Beast Creatures” pits the survivors of a cruise ship disaster in 1920 (yes, it's also a period film) against the toy-sized inhabitants of a deserted island. Since the beast creatures are, in fact, toys, the filmmakers are required to hurl them at the amateur cast in order to approximate any sense of menace.