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Lines in the final Game of Thrones season that mean more than you realize

Game of Thrones is one of the densest and most complicated shows on television, with enough mythology to make any viewer's head spin and so much background information that it requires charts and graphs to keep everything straight. On top of that, creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss make sure that each script is layered with meaning, letting fans watch and re-watch episodes so that they can keep finding clues in every line and moment.

With so much ground to cover, the show's final season is sure to follow in this tradition, with plenty of lines leading up to the long-awaited conclusion — so to help you stay on top of it all, here's a look at the most important lines from the final season of Thrones. Each of these lines carries more meaning than most might realize, so remember to pay close attention to the dialogue as the show moves toward its epic conclusion — even the shortest sentences might have more meaning than you think.

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Northerners don't much trust outsiders

After a largely silent introduction during which Daenerys (Emilia Clarke) and Jon Snow (Kit Harington) finally arrive at Winterfell to meet the rest of the Starks and convince the Northerners to join their cause, one of Jon's first utterances to Daenerys is "Northerners don't much trust outsiders," as the two of them look out at the glowering, distrustful citizenry laying eyes on the Dragon Queen for the very first time. Daenerys doesn't exactly impress either Stark sister, especially not Sansa (Sophie Turner), who clearly doesn't trust this foreign queen, despite Jon's ringing endorsement.

This isn't a good sign for Daenerys, but it's potentially a bad sign for Jon as well. As viewers know, he isn't a Stark bastard at all, but the Dorne-born son of Lyanna Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen (Daenerys' brother), giving him the biggest claim of all to the Iron Throne. It's possible that, once the North discovers Jon's true parentage, they'll abandon him too — despite his utter devotion to protecting the North, it appears that Jon, born as Aegon Targaryen, is the ultimate outsider.

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I'm defending our family. So is she

The reunion between Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) and Jon Snow was one of the most anticipated of all going into this season; after all, Jon gave Arya, now a formidable faceless killer, her very first sword, and though their time together in the first season was short-lived, it was clear to viewers that the two had an intense bond. When they meet again in the Godswood at Winterfell, it provides Thrones with one of its biggest and most satisfying emotional moments, even evoking a rare smile from Arya, who has hardened considerably over the course of the show (to say the least).

Once the two broach the subject of Sansa and her obvious lack of affection towards Daenerys, Arya defends her sister, much to Jon's surprise, especially considering that the two constantly butted heads as young girls. Standing her ground, Arya says of Sansa, "I'm defending our family. So is she," even though she has no idea that the man standing in front of her isn't part of her immediate family — though he's her first cousin, he's technically a Targaryen, not a Stark. With the truth of Jon's parentage on the verge of coming out, it remains to be seen how Arya and Sansa, who will do anything to protect the House of Stark, will react to the news that their brother isn't really a Stark at all.

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We could stay a thousand years. No one would find us

After their first tryst on the journey from Dragonstone to Winterfell at the end of the seventh season, fans have been waiting to see what's going on with Jon and Daenerys, and this episode gave viewers a peek into their (pretty weird) dating habits, which include totally normal things like riding dragons through the sky. When the two land to give the dragons a break (leading to an incredible moment when the dragons give Jon the stink-eye for kissing their mom), Daenerys spots a nearby cave, and, with a smirk, says to Jon, "We could stay a thousand years. No one would find us."

This wouldn't be the first time Jon spent some time cavorting in a cave, but Daenerys' comment brings back memories of Ygritte (Rose Leslie, who is also Kit Harington's real-life wife), a Wildling that Jon once fell in love with. The doomed couple had their first intimate moment in a cave, with Ygritte suggesting they stay there forever. With the secret about Jon and Daenerys bound to be revealed soon (specifically, that she's his aunt), their relationship is likely just as doomed — maybe this time, Jon should have listened to the lady and stayed in the cave.

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I'm waiting for an old friend

Bran Stark (Isaac Hempstead-Wright) has been, for lack of a better term, completely weird ever since he took up the mantle of the Three-Eyed Raven, and he didn't disappoint during the season premiere, lurking all over Winterfell to say cryptic things to the main characters or to simply blurt out that a portion of the Wall has been destroyed by the Night King's new ice dragon (a piece of information that, oddly, doesn't seem to trouble anybody very much). At one point, he runs into Sam Tarly (John Bradley) in the courtyard of Winterfell one evening, and when Sam asks what Bran is up to, he tells Sam he's "waiting for an old friend."

At the end of the episode, he's in the courtyard to witness the arrival of Jaime Lannister (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), who has risked his life to turn on his sister Cersei (Lena Headey), sociopath and current occupant of the Iron Throne, in order to work with their brother Tyrion (Peter Dinklage), Jon, and Daenerys to save humanity. However, the last time Jaime saw Bran, he was shoving him out of a high window after Bran caught Jaime and Cersei in a rather compromising position; though Bran didn't die, the fall cost him the use of his legs, and especially considering Bran can now see through all of space and time and he doubtless knows what else Jaime has been up to, he surely has plenty to discuss with Jaime as the season continues.

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You left the North a king and came back a... I'm not sure what you are now

When Jon Snow returns to the North with Daenerys Targaryen in tow, he's met with plenty of disapproval, but one of the loudest voices upon his return is that of Lyanna Mormont, the diminutive but tough Lady of House Mormont who has unequivocally backed Jon since the Battle of the Bastards and has become one of his biggest champions. In fact, Lyanna was instrumental in naming Jon as the new King in the North in the show's sixth season.

When members of the hall of Winterfell are confused as to whether they should refer to Jon or Daenerys as "Your Grace," Lyanna stands up and speaks for everyone when she tells Jon, "You left the North a king and came back a… I'm not sure what you are now," going on to ask, "What are you?" Unbeknownst to Lyanna, it's a pretty pointed question, considering that between Jon's departure and return, his true parentage was revealed to the audience — and really, he's still "Your Grace," except that he's not the rightful King in the North, but the King of the Seven Kingdoms.

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Almost

Bran's transition from young, naive boy to the Three-Eyed Raven has taken the better part of Thrones' run, and as he's become more and more omniscient, he's become a totally different person (or non-person, as the case may be). He's gone from just a regular boy trying to survive to an all-seeing mythical being who talks to everyone he interacts with like a college student with a superiority complex who just came back from a study abroad program. As each of his siblings reunites with Bran, they gradually figure out that he's turned a bit… well, odd, staring at him strangely and letting each other know that their brother has changed quite a bit since they all last saw him. Neither Sansa nor Arya seems to be able to make any sense out of his proclamation that he's the Three-Eyed Raven, although they do use his talents to hold Littlefinger accountable for his crimes.

In the season eight premiere, Jon is finally reunited with Bran after a few near misses. As Jon hugs a still and thoroughly unemotional Bran, he tells Bran he's finally become a man. "Almost," Bran replies, probably because he's now an all-knowing being who some think might even be part Night King, but who definitely will be one of the keys to potentially defeating the White Walkers as the series ends.